This blog is basically about the books I read. If you like it, please subscribe. It would also mean a lot if you could also tell me your opinion in the contact form.
Enjoy!

Friday, April 28, 2017

Thirteen Reasons Why Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Thirteen Reasons Why was a really touching book.

Clay Jensen was still reeling from the sudden death of Hannah Baker, a fellow classmate when a box with his name on it shows up on his doorstep. It is from Hannah, and it contains tapes, which contain the 13 reasons why she killed herself.

This book is a very important book for everyone to read. It talked about many reasons that teens commit suicide. This book faced many tough topic.

Clay was a cool character. Hannah was also a cool character. I couldn't understand why she killed herself at first, but as the story progressed I realized. The reasons were deep and scary, but they were things that teenagers really deal with.

I thought that Hannah was very relatable. She fought with things like not fitting in, and getting in with the wrong people. She realized that nobody is there for you forever. She saw high school as it really is, and not how most books portray it.

I think that everyone should read this book, because it showed some of the reasons that Hannah committed suicide.  Some of the reasons were things many of us do to people every day, and those things drove her to suicide.  We should think about what we do and say to people more

The tapes were a cool way to portray the story. They were dated and made the story even creepier. There were thirteen tapes, and each one showed a reason why Hannah went downhill.

Clay's reaction to the tapes really added to the story. His reactions were real. Hannah's voice on the tapes also was very spooky, and she seemed really depressed, and sure about her decision.

I just started the T.V. series, and I think it is almost as good as the book.

Overall this was a touching book that teaches important lessons about suicide.

View all my reviews

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Review: Thirteen Reasons Why

Thirteen Reasons Why Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Thirteen Reasons Why was a really touching book.

Clay Jensen was still reeling from the sudden death of Hannah Baker, a fellow classmate when a box with his name on it shows up on his doorstep. It is from Hannah, and it contains tapes, which contain the 13 reasons why she killed herself.

This book is a very important book for everyone to read. It talked about many reasons that teens commit suicide. This book faced many tough topic.

Clay was a cool character. Hannah was also a cool character. I couldn't understand why she killed herself at first, but as the story progressed I realized. The reasons were deep and scary, but they were things that teenagers really deal with.

I thought that Hannah was very relatable. She fought with things like not fitting in, and getting in with the wrong people. She realized that nobody is there for you forever. She saw high school as it really is, and not how most books portray it.

The tapes were a cool way to portray the story. They were dated and made the story even creepier. There were thirteen tapes, and each one showed a reason why Hannah went downhill.

Clay's reaction to the tapes really added to the story. His reactions were real. Hannah's voice on the tapes also was very spooky, and she seemed really depressed, and sure about her decision.

I just started the T.V. series, and I think it is almost as good as the book.

Overall this was a touching book that teaches important lessons about suicide.

View all my reviews

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Review: Meant to Be

Meant to Be Meant to Be by Lauren Morrill
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Meant to Be is a sweet contemporary romance.

Summary from Goodreads:
It's one thing to fall head over heels into a puddle of hazelnut coffee, and quite another to fall for - gasp - the wrong guy. Straight-A junior Julia may be accident prone, but she's the queen of following rules and being prepared. That's why she keeps a pencil sharpener in her purse and a pocket Shakespeare in her ... well, pocket. Julia also believes in fate, and that Mark, her childhood crush, is her MTB - her meant-to-be.

But this spring break, Julia's rules are about to get defenestrated (SAT word: thrown from a window) when she's partnered with her personal nemesis, class clown Jason, on a school trip to London. After one wild party, Julia starts receiving romantic texts ... from an unknown number! Jason promises to help discover the identity of her mysterious new suitor if she agrees to live a little along the way. And thus begins a wild-good chase through London, leading Julia closer and closer to the biggest surprise of all: true love.

I wanted to read this book because I loved the author's other book, Being Sloane Jacobs. Meant to Be looked like another sweet romance. It was so much different, yet so similar.

I thought Julia was an okay character. She seemed way to uptight to be a teenager. I don't think I have ever seen one THAT uptight. I mean, there are try-hards, but Julia was just crazy obsessed with being in control of everything. I could relate to her not wanting to break the rules and go to parties, but it seemed kind of unrealistic. Julia never really stood her ground like a mature teenager should. She was also kind of nuts about her MTB Mark. She has barely ever talked to the dude and she still believes that he is her one true love. Once, she starts breaking rules, she is just stupid about it. I mean, who would seriously keep texting this stranger that you gave your number to at a party? Overall, Julia seemed very planned and one sided.

Jason was Julia's polar opposite. He was a party boy, and not afraid to break the rules. He was funny to read about, but seemed a little too daring. He was inconsiderate and didn't care if he got it trouble. However, I did see his sweet side and his appeal.

The whole Paris setting really added to the book. It gave it a plot structure, and made it more than just a love triangle.

I loved the irony in this book. It seemed like it was written just as a lesson, and it worked.



View all my reviews

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Review: Happy Again

Happy Again Happy Again by Jennifer E. Smith
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Happy Again was a really cute ya novella.

Summary from Goodreads:
Ellie O'Neill and Graham Larkin fell hard for each other when a misspelled email address unexpectedly brought them together. Now, over a year has passed since they said goodbye with the promise to stay in touch, and their daily emails have dwindled to nothing. Ellie is a freshman in college and has told herself to move on, and Graham has kept himself busy starring in more movies, as well as a few tabloid columns. But fate brought these two together once before—and it isn't done with them yet.

I would initially like to state that I have never read the first book in this series. I do want to, and when this was available at my public libraries online site, I checked it out for a quick read. I hope to read This Is What Happy Looks Like someday soon.

Ellie seemed like a cool character. She was just an average teen who had dated a movie star the past summer. Now she is isn college and focusing on schoolwork, When her rroomates ask her if she wants to go to NYC with them for the weekend, she reluctantly agrees. There, she runs into Graham.

Graham was the always portrayed perfect movie star. He was cute, flirty, and way to good to be realistic.

The romance was short and sweet, and I thought the plot moved well.

View all my reviews

Monday, April 10, 2017

Review: Sophomore Switch

Sophomore Switch Sophomore Switch by Abby McDonald
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Sophmore Switch was a cute novel by Abby McDonald.

Summary from Goodreads:
Take an administrative snafu, a bad breakup, and what shall heretofore be known as "The Hot-Tub Incident," and you’ve got two unprepared sophomores on a semester abroad. For American party girl Tasha, an escape to Oxford may be a chance to ditch her fame as a tabloid temptress, but wading Uggs-deep in feminist theory is not her idea of a break. Meanwhile, the British half of the exchange, studious Emily, nurses an aching heart amid the bikinis and beer pong of U.C. Santa Barbara. Soon desperation has the girls texting each other tips — on fitting in, finding love, and figuring out who they really are. With an anthropologist’s eye for detail and a true ear for teen-speak, exciting new novelist Abby McDonald has crafted a funny, fast-paced, poignant look at survival, sisterhood, and the surprising ways we discover our true selves.

I thought this book was very fluffy but interesting. Tasha was a stereotypical California school girl. She spent more time at the beach that at lectures. Emily is completely opposite. She is a studios, smart girl. When the two switch places, there is some trouble. Tasha can't keep up with the workload, and Emily is bored and wants to learn more. But they each find their special talents at the other school.

I wanted to read this book because it looked like Being Sloane Jacobs. I liked that one, and was in the mood for a similar read. This one was okay, but not as good.

I liked the lessons the girls learned about themselves. Tasha, or Natasha, learned that she was a feminist and that school is good. Emily learned that school isn't everything, and that she should live a little.

The two girls interacted throughout the novel, and it was fun to read. Their texts were lighthearted, and it was cool seeing them work out their issues.

Overall, this is a sweet and fluffy read.

View all my reviews

Monday, April 3, 2017

Review: No Holding Back

No Holding Back No Holding Back by Kate Evangelista
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I RECIEVED THIS BOOK FROM THE AUTHOR IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW. THIS DOES NOT AFFECT MY VIEWS OR OPINIONS IN ANY WAY(S).

No Holding Back was a pretty good LGBT romance.

Summary from Goodreads:
Everyone knows that Nathan is in love with his best friend, Preston…Everyone except Preston. Nathan has always accepted that Preston was too focused on his swim training to worry about love. But Preston is heading off to train for the Olympics soon, so if Nathan wants his chance at love, he has to speak up now. But saying “I love you” is surprisingly difficult, even for someone as confident as Nathan. Maybe a whirlwind vacation in Europe could help? But… what if it doesn’t work out and he loses the best friend he’s ever had?

The romance was good. It was sweet and full of emotion. It could get kind of sappy, but it was still good. However, it could also get kind of slow

I thought it was nice seeing some of the characters from No Love Allowed. They were back and vivid as ever. They made the story more interesting.

Nathan kind of annoyed me. He was too lovey-dovy and sappy. I liked Preston and his swimming. It made him relatable and a cool character. Didi was my favorite returning character. I loved seeing her blossom more.
I like the way this author really makes the story vivid. It is written beautifully in a rich setting, which is perfect.

Overall, this is a pretty good romance.

View all my reviews